Article Summary 2015-05-21

Usually I send out the articles one-by-one to one or more people who I think might be interested in them. Other times, I post it to my Facebook or LinkedIn feeds. For some, clip them into my Evernote ‘Articles’ notebook so I can reference them later (which also filters out the ads). Finally, others I bookmark on my Pinboard shared browser bookmarks log.

In thinking about all this, what I have been doing is not that effective for the following reasons:

  • I am probably making incorrect assumptions in the filter bubble I inevitably create by only sending some articles to some folks.
  • I create much disjointed work for myself by being inconsistent about distribution.
  • I actually make it harder to find articles when I later need them.
  • I also make it harder to refer someone new to an article I somehow sent to someone else if they might be interested in it.

Today I am trying something new. Periodically I will then publish up to ten of the best in a simple post like this one on my blog which cross posts to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Tumbler. Eventually, I will also send a link to the post out to all individuals who might be interested in at least one of the articles and to a general mailing list folks can sign up for if they always want to receive the post.

Without further ado, here are is the first installment:

“Boeing Patents Sci-Fi Force Field That Deflects Explosive Shock Waves”

Boeing has a way to create a “Laser-Induced Plasma Channel” (LIPC) that can absorb the shock wave produced by an explosion. While it will not divert the projectile itself, it does divert the destructive shockwave. Thank you to Josh Garrett for sharing this article.

“Jeremy England, the Man Who May One-Up Darwin”

It may be alive, but does it have a soul? Thank you to Jerry Horne (blog) for sharing this article.

“Haskell Programmers Are Liars: Or, The Real Way to Generate a List of Primes in Haskell”

Setting the reaction provoking, click-bait, title aside this is a really interesting article on Melissa E. O’Neill‘s correct approach to the Sieve of Eratosthenes implementation in Haskell.

“Ember.js: An Antidote To Your Hype Fatigue”

While certainly written with a bias towards Ember.js, this article does have a wealth of good background information on the wide-range of front-end JavaScript frameworks. It then goes on to provide an overview of Ember.js.

“Wolfram Language Artificial Intelligence: The Image Identification Project”

Being a fan of Stephen Wolfram, I have highlighted many of his articles before. Here is one reviewing their new image recognition efforts. More than just a product announcement, it goes into his background assumptions and development efforts openly discussing the challenges he faced.

“The revolutionary Lily Flying Camera Drone is brought to life thanks to 3D printing”

An amazing drone that follows you around.

“DARPA Aims to Accelerate Memory Function for Skill Learning”

DARPA is looking into “memory replay” (Restoring Active Memory (RAM) Replay) as a way to help folks remember events and learn new skills. Johnny Mnemonic will be just around the corner.

“DIY Lock Cracker”

A very clever “robot” for cracking the Master Lock combination locks. Very cool.

“New Sentry Electronic Fire Safe Opened in Seconds with No Sign of Entry” (video)

And, while we are on the topic of breaking into things, the money starts at 3:55 into the video. It is amazing what rare earth elements can do and how inexpensive they can be. Here is where you can get one of those magnets–195.8# of pull for just $88.99.

“Mad Max: Fury Road”

I have not yet seen it, but there are some interesting positive reviews coming in on what had looked to me to be not much more than a nonsensical action movie. Also, it is getting some interesting press about subverting movie sexism.