Article Summary 2015-06-26

“What Is Code? If You Don’t Know, You Need to Read This”

This is probably the best quick summary explaining what software (and computers for that matter) really is. Thank you to Laura Haverkamp for bringing this one to my attention. There is also a good “Behind the Scenes” article. And, I have taken the pages, cleaned them up, and produced an Evernote Summary.

“Electron Microscope Slow-Motion Video of a Vinyl LP”

A great video of a needle reading the grooves of a vinyl record from the guys at Applied Science. Ben Krasnow goes through the process he pursued to be able to make this video. Ben maintains an awesome YouTube channel.

“Killjoys Really is a Most Excellent Space Adventure”

io9 goes on to say that it may (finally) be our next Firefly. I’ll believe it when I see it, but you can bet this one makes my list of shows to binge watch once the first season has concluded. (P.S. If you are a Firefly fan, please vote it up on IMDB.)

Math Puzzle: “The Nine Schoolgirls Challenge”

“Fifteen young ladies in a school walk out three abreast [as a group] for seven days in succession: it is required to arrange them daily, so that no two shall walk twice abreast.”

This problem launched a whole branch of mathematics called combinatorial design theory. A young mathematician, Peter Keevash, has made some breakthroughs with respect to the general case problem within which the above puzzle lives.

“‘EPIC’ fail–how OPM hackers tapped the mother load of espionage data”

An excellent and detailed summary of what is probably the most truly damaging hack of government systems in terms of individual safety.

“Building Prototypes by Dan Gelbart”

Hackaday has pulled together an excellent series of 18 videos of Dan Gelbart demonstrating a whole series of mechanical prototype development techniques. Dan was the co-founder of Creo–a company that developed laser-based products for the printing industry and sold to Kodak (remember them) for $1 billion. Dan has gone on to become an award-winning entrepreneur and inventor. He teaches Mechanical engineering at the University of British Columbia.

“Leading People When They Know More Than You Do”

Truth is that in a knowledge worker career (such as software development) folks who move into management will be managing folks who know more about the task than they do and, in addition, who may be more highly compensated. This is not the “Peter Principle” which is more applicable to the Industrial Revolution as opposed to the Information Age. Instead, it is a natural outgrowth of the realities of knowledge workers. This article is one of the best I’ve read so far providing practical advice for managers and executives who find themselves in this situation.

“Grady Booch on the Future of Software Engineering”

Grady Booch (blog) speaking at the 37th International Conference of Software Engineering (ICSE 2015). This is an excellent discussion about both the history and the future of Software Engineering.

Grady is the guy that developed the Unified Modelling Language (UML). He was also the Chief Scientist for Rational Software Corp and IBM Research. He is both an ACM and IEEE Fellow and he won the Lovelace Medal in 2013. He has also worked for Facebook.

 

An Interactive “Powers of Ten”

Back around 1990, Philip Morrison published a wonderful book called, Powers of Ten. Powers of Ten explored numeric order of magnitude changes in size and scale of real world objects. It served to illustrate society’s general state of numeracy (or lack thereof). Today Liza Krug passed to me a web site created by NASA that boils down to an interactive “Powers of Ten” book where one can move a slider to see order of magnitude changes. Check it out:

Astronomy Picture of the Day, 2014-01-12
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140112.html