Article Summary 2015-05-29

44 years of UNIX, Time-lapse Photo Mining, Self Healing Buildings, Free NASA Code, Realtime User Monitoring, Email for Apple Watch, Two-thirds of Europeans Have Same Fathers, New Language for FPGAs, Smartphone with Projector, and Light Bulb with Speaker.

“A Repository with 44 Years of Unix Evolution”

This is one of the coolest things I’ve seen for a nerds and geeks alike in a long time–a GitHub repository that traces 44 years of evolution in the UNIX operating system code base from 1972 to 2015–659,000 commits from 850 identified individual contributors.

“Time-lapse Mining from Internet Photos”

These guys mined 86 million public photos then collapsed ones of places into a common viewpoint. From that, they were able to develop time-lapse videos. Their detailed paper is an amazing read.

“The First Building That Can Heal Its Own Cracks With Biological Cement”

Self-healing buildings.

“It Is Rocket Science! NASA Releases Abundance of Free Code”

Open source code from NASA

“How to provide real user monitoring for single-page applications”

Discusses three challenges single-page apps (SPA) face with respect to real user monitoring (RUM) along with a solution path for Angular-based SPAs using Boomerang.

“How To Send a Hidden Version of Your Email That Only Apple Watch Will See”

Discusses how to craft email messages to specifically utilize the capabilities of the Apple Watch.

“A handful of Bronze-Age men could have fathered two thirds of Europeans”

“Genetic study reveals that two-thirds of European men can be traced back to just three individuals who lived between 3,500 and 7,300 years ago.”

Presents even more detail on the research into the Y-chromosomal most recent common ancestor (“Y-MRCA” or “Y-chromosomal Adam”) and the matrilineal most recent common ancestor (“MRCA” or “Mitochondrial Eve”). If you want to have your genetic ancestry documented, there are some services that can give you a genealogical DNA test.

“Enginursday: A New Approach to FPGAs!”

To increase the usability and approachability of Embedded Micro’s Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) “Mojo” development board, they have released a new language named Lucid. Lucid should make customizable hardware as approachable as the Arduino made embedded microcontrollers. Hopefully once things calm down with my bookshelf project, I can start playing with one of these fellows.

“Lenovo’s Projector Phone Beams a Touchscreen Onto Any Surface”

For at least a couple years now, after seeing the projected keyboards and miniature video projectors, I have been saying that what someone needs to do is create a phone that integrates the two. I was specifically thinking of something that could project your view onto a wall at the same time it could project a keyboard. Since this only has one projector it cannot do both yet, but it is certainly getting closer. Not available in the States.

“Sony’s LED Bulb Doubles as a Bluetooth Speaker”

Now if they could only get a variation of this out that supports changing the color like the Philips Hue, one would have the ultimate in mood lighting. But, none the less, this is pretty cool. Also not yet available in the States. (Do you sometimes feel like we’re lagging a bit these days?)

Raspberry Pi Alive and Kicking

Raspberry Pi

By P. Todd Decker

With only about 20 minutes of work, once I had the right supporting peripherals, I was able to get my Raspberry Pi up and running. Amazing little computer that I will be using as a master controller for Ashley’s continued quadrotor robotics experiments (resources) and a controller for my aquaponics garden (resources)

I’m using the Occidentalis v0.2 Linux distribution from Adafruit with a Ourlink 802.11n USB wireless adapter, Belkin powered 4-port USB hub, MC SAite mini keyboard, an old wireless mouse from Embarq marketing days, and a cheap 19″ HDMI Sansui monitor from Walmart.

Adafruit provides step-by-step tutorials that couldn’t make it any easier to get started.

P. Todd

Update: 4:03pm

With just a little more work, you can also set up the Raspberry Pi so that you can (once configured) drop the direct attached monitor, keyboard, and mouse. Then just use your primary desktop to access it remotely with both a graphical interface (via VNC), terminal (standard SSH), and file sharing (Mac Finder).

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